Cubism: Breaking Down Reality in Art

Introduction

Cubism is a style of visual art that developed between the early 20th century and the 1920s. In this period, artists such as Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque created works using geometric shapes and multiple perspectives to create an abstracted image of reality. Cubism challenged traditional ways of understanding art by changing how reality is represented in paintings using distinct geometric shapes and multiple perspectives. In this blog we would try to understand what makes Cubism stand out from the rest.

Cubism as an avant-garde movement

Cubism was an early-20th-century avant-garde movement that challenged traditional ways of understanding art. It changed how reality was represented in paintings using distinct geometric shapes and multiple perspectives. The term “cubism” was first used by the French poet Jean Cremeaux in 1908; he described it as “the art of drawing cubes.” The movement began with Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque, who were both born in 1881 and lived until 1973 (Picasso) and 1963 (Braque).

The term cubism and the beginning

Cubism is a style of painting that was popular in the early 20th century, especially between 1908 and 1914. The word ‘cubism’ comes from the French word for cube, as cubes were often used to create abstract shapes in cubist art. The movement was started by Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque, who both rejected traditional ways of understanding art. Instead of drawing on their experiences or observations of reality (as previous artists had done), they created new ways of seeing objects by breaking down their subjects into simple geometric shapes like squares or triangles–a technique known as fragmentation. This allowed them to create multiple perspectives at once; for example: if you look at a chair from above it looks like one object but if you look at it from below then it appears very different! The word cubism was coined because some cubist paintings have a flat, almost abstract look to them. It’s believed that the idea of cubism was born after a 1906 exhibition in Paris where Picasso showed his paintings and during the course of it he met Georges Braque, another famous painter who worked with him on cubism. At this point, Picasso had already been experimenting with cubist techniques for a couple of years (he had even made some sketches as far back as 1904). Braque was inspired by what he saw from Picasso’s paintings; he began using many of the same techniques in his own work which helped to develop cubism further than either artist could have done alone.

The visual vocabulary of kaleidoscopic shapes, forms and colours has been the inspiration for the present series of works in which movement provided the dominant focus.

Kaleidoscope Lakshmi ā€“ By Pooja SIā€“ Check Out The Painting

Cubism- the change in perspectives

Cubism challenged traditional ways of understanding art by changing how reality is represented in paintings using distinct geometric shapes and multiple perspectives. The movement was a reaction to impressionism, which focused on light and colour rather than form. Cubists wanted to depict objects as they really looked instead of as they appeared from one angle only, so they used multiple perspectives at once. This allowed them to paint an object from many places at once–even though it might look strange when you see it from one angle, it will make sense from another position (and vice versa). Cubist artists also favoured geometric shapes over natural ones such as spheres or cylinders because these were easier for them to draw consistently across multiple compositions; this style became known as “artistic geometry.”

Here are some examples of paintings from the Cubism movement:

  • Les Demoiselles dā€™ Avignon (1907) by Pablo Picasso. This painting is considered one of the most significant pieces from the Cubist movement, featuring five nude female figures with distorted and angular shapes.
  • Portrait of Pablo Picasso (1912) by Juan Gris is known for its geometric shapes and precision, making it one of the quintessential Cubist artworks.
  • The Weeping Woman (1937) by Picasso is a piece characterized by the use of monochromatic tones and the depiction of a deconstructed face. Its emphasis on emotions over reality is Cubism at its height.
  • Glass of Beer and Playing Cards (1913) by Gris, is a painting known for its use vibrant colours and complex construction influenced by Cubism. It depicts a glass filled with amber-coloured beer and a deck of playing cards scattered on a table.

Conclusion

Cubism as a style of art changed how we see the world. It challenged traditional ways of understanding art by changing how reality is represented in paintings using distinct geometric shapes and multiple perspectives. Cubism led to some interesting pieces of art that still make us think today. We owe a huge debt to these pioneers who revolutionised the art world forever. It is never too late to explore if you have never looked into an art world comprising of dimensions. Have fun as you explore more.  


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